3.2 Security

Equipment, Support, and Technology for UK Defence and Security: A Consultation Paper – Part Three – Specific Areas – 3.2 Security

3.2 Security

Security in the UK The National Security Strategy recognises that many of the threats faced by the UK cannot be addressed through purely military means. Of the priority risks to the UK, all of the four Tier One risks and many in the other Tiers require responses from the security and intelligence agencies, police, or [...]

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3.2.1 The security market in the UK

The UK security market can be described as having four principal sectors: integrated security systems; security sub-systems, comprising many sub-sectors such as CCTV and biometrics; cyber security and information assurance; person-based services, including consultancy, training, guarding, and escorting. Any marketplace comprises a demand side and a supply side. Unlike the defence market, the demand side [...]

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3.2.2 Science and technology requirements

The approach of the UK Government to tackling these risks is underpinned by the effective use of science and technology, much of which is provided by the private sector. Creating an efficient and effective security science and technology market in the UK requires a much more coherent security sector than we currently have. Achieving this [...]

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3.2.3 Government laboratories and the private sector

Once requirements are clearly articulated, delivering national security capabilities across so many organisations is a difficult logistical problem. The Ministry of Defence, the Home Office, the police and the security and intelligence agencies all have their own methods of procurement and delivery, from purchasing commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products to developing equipment in-house. And this is [...]

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3.2.4 Security standards

Standards play different roles within each of the four sectors of the security marketplace. While it is difficult to create standards for an end-to-end security system, the individual systems are likely to contain product and performance standards along with interface/interoperability standards. In the information arena, standards in encryption and information assurance would be likely. Finally, [...]

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3.2.5 Innovation in the security sector

The pace of change in science and technology is increasing. New products and software are released so frequently that it is a serious challenge to keep up with developments. Government must make every effort to anticipate the technologies that could be used by our adversaries, and to harness technologies that can help us respond to [...]

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3.2.6 The international security market

The UK has a worldwide reputation for security expertise and technology. This is due to our long history of applied security, particularly with regards to counter-terrorism, along with strong science and engineering skills. UK security companies and products are thus respected for their fitness and reliability. However, exports of security products and services are not [...]

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3.2 Security – Key Questions

Questions: Q76. What methods can the government use to identify systemic capability gaps and communicate them to industry and academia, while maintaining national security? Q77. What steps should be taken to make the security market function more efficiently than at present? Q78. How can Government achieve more efficient procurement in the public sector security market [...]

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