Part Two - Cross-Cutting Issues

Equipment, Support, and Technology for UK Defence and Security: A Consultation Paper – Part Two – Cross-Cutting Issues

Part Two – Cross-cutting Issues

This part of the Green Paper looks at the key cross-cutting topics on which we are seeking views. It covers three categories: national security, technology, and broader policy. To guide the consultation process, we have posed a general question and specific subsidiary questions at the end of each section. These indicate the areas where we [...]

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2.1 National Security

The distinguishing feature of equipment, support, and technology choices in the defence and security fields is that they are subject to overriding national security considerations. Traditionally, our national security has been viewed in terms of defence matters. The NSS recognises, however, that many of the threats faced by the UK cannot be addressed through purely [...]

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2.1.1 Sovereignty

Most defence and security choices in relation to equipment, support, and technology are concerned with obtaining and maintaining the various national security capabilities needed to protect the UK and its interests. However, two specific aspects of those capabilities are particularly important and require separate consideration. These are: operational advantage, which is fundamental to the overall [...]

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2.1.1 Sovereignty – General and Specific Questions

General question: Q2. What factors should the UK take into account when assessing the national security implications of acquisition in the defence and security sectors? Specific question:   Q3. Are there particular technological or industrial capabilities, including skills, that you believe are crucial to national security? If so, please give details. Q4. Are any of [...]

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2.1.2 Working with other countries

Most of the arrangements we make to protect our national security have an international dimension. Therefore, it is often more beneficial for the UK to work directly with other nations on research and on equipment and support acquisition than to proceed alone with a market-based approach. This is true both in terms of specific programmes [...]

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2.1.2 Working with other countries – General and Specific Questions

General question: Q6. How can the UK get the best from working with other nations, whilst avoiding the pitfalls? Specific questions: Q7. What are the conditions for successful bilateral/multinational procurement? How can Government best assess these before committing to a project? Q8. How can the UK engagement with NATO allies and European partners in bilateral [...]

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2.2 Science and Technology

Science and technology7 plays a critical role in providing the UK with a decisive advantage over potential adversaries, delivering the NSS, and countering the many varied security threats faced by the UK. Maintaining a technological edge, with the necessary underpinning science and facilities, is often vital to keeping one step ahead of our opponents, both [...]

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2.2 Science and technology – General and Specific Questions

General question: Q11. What should be the balance of priorities for research investment in science and technology for defence and security purposes? Specific questions: Q12. Given the changing defence and security threats, the breadth of science and technology providers, the pace of innovation and defence’s ability to influence this, what should be the balance of [...]

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2.2.1 Priorities for our future science and technology investment

New challenges in accessing science and technology The Government’s science and technology capability comprises a mix of in-house expertise, delivery through the wider supply base, and through collaboration, both with the industrial and academic base and with international partners. At present, Government science and technology for security and defence takes place across a number of [...]

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2.2.2 Benefits from international collaboration

International Research Collaboration (IRC) plays a fundamental role both in achieving value for money from our own research investment in expertise and technology, and also in supporting the development of affordable military and security capability. It provides access to, and influence over, science and technology which the UK does not have, cannot afford to have, [...]

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