2.2 Science and technology

Equipment, Support, and Technology for UK Defence and Security: A Consultation Paper – Part Two – Cross-Cutting Issues – 2.2 Science and technology

2.2 Science and Technology

Science and technology7 plays a critical role in providing the UK with a decisive advantage over potential adversaries, delivering the NSS, and countering the many varied security threats faced by the UK. Maintaining a technological edge, with the necessary underpinning science and facilities, is often vital to keeping one step ahead of our opponents, both [...]

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2.2 Science and technology – General and Specific Questions

General question: Q11. What should be the balance of priorities for research investment in science and technology for defence and security purposes? Specific questions: Q12. Given the changing defence and security threats, the breadth of science and technology providers, the pace of innovation and defence’s ability to influence this, what should be the balance of [...]

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2.2.1 Priorities for our future science and technology investment

New challenges in accessing science and technology The Government’s science and technology capability comprises a mix of in-house expertise, delivery through the wider supply base, and through collaboration, both with the industrial and academic base and with international partners. At present, Government science and technology for security and defence takes place across a number of [...]

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2.2.2 Benefits from international collaboration

International Research Collaboration (IRC) plays a fundamental role both in achieving value for money from our own research investment in expertise and technology, and also in supporting the development of affordable military and security capability. It provides access to, and influence over, science and technology which the UK does not have, cannot afford to have, [...]

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2.2.3 Delivering our science and technology priorities through the wider

A huge amount of innovative science and technology development takes place outside the defence and security markets. We must develop and evolve means to tap this investment to meet our science and technology requirements; seeking stronger relationships with universities and the Research Councils; removing barriers to private venture investment; and encouraging civil suppliers, SMEs and [...]

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2.2.4 Exploitation of innovation and reducing cost of ownership

The potential benefits of reducing cost of ownership for UK Armed Forces and security agencies of meeting the many challenges with technological ingenuity will only be realised if innovation is generated from the widest possible source of supply and, perhaps more importantly, properly exploited to be delivered in time to be used. There are, however, [...]

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2.2.5 Being a customer of capabilities that are dependent on science and

Many aspects of the UK’s critical defence and security capabilities are either bespoke or adapted for specific purposes and highly technical. Our capabilities are used in demanding environments and there is an essential need to understand how they behave in deployment and use. As a customer for such capabilities, we need to be intelligent in [...]

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